Blunt Reviews Presents: Chasing Amy (1997)

chasing amy

What I admire most about Kevin Smith’s Chasing Amy, aside from the fact it feels as though he was branching into maturity with his writing, it’s that this is not a straight forward film. There are times when I’m smiling and laughing at the happiness the characters are experiencing, which are counterbalanced by moments where I’m having my heart ripped out and handed to me in a fucking paper bag because of the crushing honesty found in the dialogue. This is genuinely a fantastically written, funny film that is utterly heartbreaking, but you love every minute and want more.

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Blunt Reviews Presents: Celebrity (1999)

celebrity

I’m sure if I scratched below the surface I would find a perfectly fine and interesting film somewhere in Celebrity. However I’m unable to do that because on the surface I am distracted by the fact that throughout the film Kenneth Branagh persistently delivers one of the worse Woody Allen impersonations I have ever heard. I think the film is half decent, it appeared to be quite an interesting look into the world of Hollywood film making, and there’s a solid performance from a young Leonardo DiCaprio, but aside from that it feels like one of Woody Allen’s throwaway films.

Blunt Reviews Presents: Groundhog Day (1993)

groundhog day

This is the type of film I live for. A surreal and intelligent comedy that I can keep coming back to, knowing that I will enjoy it even more each time. It centers on man trapped in a time loop experiencing the same day over and over again, with Bill Murray bringing heart and soul to the three dimensional lead character. It’s a simple concept but the execution is superb, spreading the message that we should not waste a single minute we are given in life. Harold Ramis was a fantastic writer, and this film will always be his masterpiece.

Blune Reviews Presents: Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)

home alone 2

It’s the return of America’s worst parents, two of the flimsiest robbers with persistently underdeveloped back stories, and one of the most sadistic kids cinema has ever seen. If the plot for the first film annoyed you then rest assured because they went one step further this time, pinning the accidental loss of a child on a complete lack of security in American airports. And if this consumerist wet dream isn’t enough to piss you off already, just remember there’s a nice little cameo from Donald Trump, who surprisingly isn’t singing about a WHITE Christmas. Burn him with fire.

Blunt Reviews Presents: Home Alone (1990)

home alone

Now that we’ve grown up this film is a nightmare! A number of thoughts plagued me upon rewatching this film:

  1. Kevin is one sadistic little bastard.
  2. A happy ending after the shit Kevin pulled? Piss off!
  3. The robbers are like members of the fucking Justice League. How much pain can they withstand?
  4. This whole situation could have been avoided if the McCallister family stopped pissing about. They’ve got seven kids and can’t even control one of them.
  5. Child protective services know about this family right?
  6. How the hell is a film about a home invasion festive?

It’s just a mess.

 

Blunt Reviews Presents: Titanic (1998)

Titanic

This is quite simply one of the most repugnant films I’ve ever seen. On a technical level there’s perhaps some merit, but apart from that it’s just distasteful rubbish. It is solid proof that the Academy Awards mean fuck all, because if this film deserves the award for Best Screenplay then we should give fucking Danny Dyer the award for Leading Actor. Forget the eleven Oscars and the Box Office figures, this is badly written, self important horseshit that ignores compelling true stories, and essentially exploits the deaths of hundreds of people to give James Cameron an extortionate pay cheque.

Blunt Reviews Presents: Ed Wood (1995)

ed wood

This will always be Tim Burton’s masterpiece. A quirky true story that allowed Burton to apply his talents properly, making an interesting film that I thoroughly enjoyed. I actually admire Ed Wood because it has the difficult task of being a film about making films, but Burton masters this niche genre. This’ll be one of the only times I’ll say this but what elevates the film is the central performance by Johnny Depp. He captures the hyperactive behaviour of a creative thinker, and the desperation of a man following his dreams, which holds the film together at its core.

Blunt Reviews Presents: Fargo (1996)

fargo

It’s difficult to talk positively about Fargo because so much has been said of it already, it’s actually difficult to find something new to say. It is genuinely a fantastic film, from two of the most talented minds working in cinema. The Coen Brothers have their ups and downs in their back catalogue, but this is undoubtedly one of their best. The screenplay alone is perfect, but when you add the superb performances from the cast, the cinematography that really puts you in the shit with the characters, and the Coen’s creative spark, it makes for a truly unique experience.